A Solution To PED's...A Lifetime Ban

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Major League Baseball has tried to clean up baseball for the past decade. However, their attempts have been pitiful.

Let's get one thing straight...baseball is a business.

Every organization wants to sell the most amount of their products as they can. This includes tickets and apparel. No fan wants to buy a jersey of a guy who can't hit a home run and then pay fifty dollars on a ticket to watch them. However, fans will pay big bucks to buy a guys jersey and watch them crush a ball out of a stadium. That's the reality of business.

If Major League Baseball and the owners wants to get serious about banning PED's (Performance Enhancing Drugs) and show fans that it's not a business they'll make one move that will change the game forever. Anyone who uses PED's will be given a lifetime ban from baseball, and have their contracts voided.

This may seem extreme but...

"Regardless of the verdict of juries, no player that throws a ball game; no player that undertakes or promises to throw a ball game; no player that sits in a conference with a bunch of crooked players and gamblers where the ways and means of throwing ball games are planned and discussed and does not promptly tell his club about it, will ever play professional baseball. Of course, I don't know that any of these men will apply for reinstatement, but if they do, the above are at least a few of the rules that will be enforced. Just keep in mind that, regardless of the verdict of juries, baseball is competent to protect itself against crooks, both inside and outside the game."

That was the statement by Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis on August 3, 1920, when he banned the eight Chicago White Sox players who were associated in throwing the 1919 World Series. 

Throwing a game and taking PED's go hand-and-and in my book. Throwing a game cheats people by players not playing at the level they are capable of for financial gain. While players using PED's cheats people by using a substance to play at a high level that the player wouldn't be capable of playing at without the substance for financial gain. 

The owners hired Landis to clean up baseball, and he did just that. However, with the Major League Baseball Players Association, Collective Bargaining Agreement, and high-powered attorney's this may not be easy today.

If owners and the commissioners office are truly serious about cleaning up baseball they'll push the issue at the next CBA, or amend the current one.

We live in a society were information is easily accessible. Players need to know what they are putting in their bodies. There are so many outlets for players to check on what trainers and doctors are giving them. As a professional player it's their responsibility to know what is going in their bodies.  If a player decides to put a PED in their system then are "cheating," and in my mind "crooked.

It's important to understand that PED's give players an unfair advantage. It enables players to be stronger, faster, and recover from injuries quicker. Is that fair to teams that are clean? Or more importantly is it fair to players that are clean. Imagine spending ten years in the minor leagues, working your tail off to get to the majors, only to find out that you are being passed over be another player. Now imagine that same scenario, but finding out the player you were passed over for a player who took PED's? To me it's like lying on résumé to get a job. In most cases if an employer found out you'd be terminated. So then why are these players allowed to keep playing? Because in most cases they stand behind the players union, CBA, and their lawyers.

As a fan of baseball this subject matters to me. It's not right to have players from the past cheated out of records. Why should names like Ruth, Gehrig, Mays, and Aaron be spoken in the same breath as a players who took or were suspected of taking PED's. If baseball is a game that relies so much on it's history for it's livelihood then we should clean up the game so that the crooks aren't associated with the heroes. 
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